Hair Wigs for Women: Their History and Uses

Women in wigs

A wig is not just a fashion accessory. It’s an essential element of identity.

Back in the early days, a wig was a symbol of wealth and power, signifying intellectual, sexual and social status. Today, however, it’s used for fun and entertainment as well as a solution to thinning hair conditions.  

Take a look at this timeline and learn about the evolution of wigs as well as its various uses, from one civilisation to the next.

Women's Wigs Throughout the Ages

Ancient Civilisation. The wig played a major role in the social scene during the Egyptian and Roman ancient civilisations. The Roman women wore them as fashion accessories and symbols of social ranks while the Egyptians used them as part of their daily attire. Their styles and sizes often indicated religious piety and status in the community.

The Renaissance. The wigs lost their social relevance and appeal during the Dark Ages.  But the Renaissance brought back its resurgence as part of everyday wardrobe for women. Because beautiful locks were given great importance, the use of elaborate hairpieces with jewel embellishments became popular.  

17th Century. King Louis XIII of France pioneered the use of these hair accessories to disguise his premature baldness. During his reign and that of his son, King Louis XIV, the wig became a fashion emblem in the French courts and all over Europe. As a result, it became an integral part of a nobleman’s costume; thus, making it a symbol of power and political status.

18th Century. The use of elaborate, white powdered coiffures with long ringlets were widespread during this time. Wearing toupees was also considered fashionable. The English monarch, Queen Elizabeth I, also became famous for wearing a close-fitted and elaborate red wig. Most women during this period wore coiffures that are supplemented with synthetic hair strands.

19th Century. During the Victorian era, the wearing of wigs as a symbol of social standing was abandoned. Although some women continued to wear wigs, most preferred to look natural. In the court of Queen Victoria, the ladies wore shorter fringes and headpieces with simple designs.

20th Century. The advent of technology helped coiffeurs create natural-looking wigs that are made from both synthetic and real human hair. Also during this period, wig makers started using postiches or pre-made curls, ringlets and buns to enhance the volume of the tresses. Wigs were primarily used by people who worked in the entertainment industry, such as those in television, movies, theatres and cabarets. These were part of their costumes, allowing them to take on different personas.

21st Century. Nowadays, wigs are not only used for fun and entertainment, but also to cover up balding problems. Most people who use them are those with thinning hair and undergoing chemotherapy and radiation treatment.

For women suffering from alopecia, wigs can be a great part of your everyday wardrobe.

Here at Transitions Hair for Women, our next generation wigs for women are made of 100% human hair, ensuring that it looks undetectable and natural.

Our custom-made wigs capture the exact curvature of your scalp, creating the ideal solution that gives you total control over your look.  

We also offer a range of proven hair loss treatment and cosmetic solutions that are of the highest quality.

Get in touch for a free no obligation consultation. For any other inquiry, you can also call us at 1300 427 778 and one of our qualified hair specialists will contact you.

At Transitions Hair for Women, we take a consultative approach to your wig selection.